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COLLECTIONS

ELISABETH WESTIN BERG: The Skokloster castle library.
Aristocratic book collections in seven rooms.

GUNVOR BONDS & ANNELI EKSTRÖM:
Column orders and Chinese pavilions. Book treasures in the oldest library of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts.

MARGARETA LINDGREN:
Architectural drawings at the Uppsala University Library.

SUSANNA STRÖMBERG:
The Stockholm Building Society's book collection.

LISELOTTE WINKA: The Fred Forbat Book Collection
in the Library of the Swedish Museum of Architecture.

ELISABETH KIHLÉN:
The library and the conservation of buildings.

ULRIKA LESSMAR HOLMGREN:
The architectural database ARKDOK.

LISBETH RAAHAUGE KARLSSON: Architects, architecture,
and architectural literature on the Internet.





ELISABETH WESTIN BERG: The Skokloster castle library.
Aristocratic book collections in seven rooms.

Photo: Samuel Uhrdin, LSH In 1654 Field Marshal Carl Gustaf Wrangel started to build Skokloster Castle on the shore of Lake Mälaren. The estate became a confirmation of his economic power, symbolizing himself and his family. Wrangel had his book collection arranged on the top floor, facing the lake to the east. His books on architecture display a mixture of learned theses by Renaissance architects from the 16th century and building manuals from his own time. After Wrangel's death libraries which belonged to the Brahe, Bielke and Scheffer families have been brought to Skokloster. They are kept together in the same order they had in their original environments. Since the beginning of the 19th century the growing collection has been placed in seven adjacent rooms. The books are arranged in grid-faced bookcases. The walls have simple paintings with trompe-l'oeil curtains and columns. A large number of maps and celestial and terrestrial globes in various dimensions surround the books. <Back to list of content



GUNVOR BONDS & ANNELI EKSTRÖM:
Column orders and Chinese pavilions. Book treasures in the oldest library of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts.

William Chambers: Dessin des édeifices, meubles, habits, machines et ustenciles des chinois.., Londres, 1757. The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm The oldest library of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm, named "1806 års bibliotek" after the year the catalogue was printed, is in size modest, only circa 1000 volumes. Nevertheless, it contains most of the essential literature about architecture and landscape gardening in the areas of theory and design. Through purchases and gifts, it was founded during the last three decades of the 18th century. Especially for the School of Architecture, established in 1773 and with teaching starting about ten years later, it had a most decisive significance. The focal point of the studies was the column orders in the classical works of Vitruvius, Alberti, Scamozzi, Vignola and Palladio, the latter in a first edition from 1570.

The predominant part of the stock of books originates from members of the Academy, regarding garden literature many of them from the first trained landscape garden architect in Sweden, the famous F.M. Piper, creator of the English gardens of Haga and Drottningholm. He traveled around England, sketching in renowned gardens - his drawings, most of them from Stourhead, are kept in the Academy - and was a friend of William Chambers, whose controversial works on Chinese garden art can be found in the library as well as J.B. du Haldes information about China (1735). Other important authors representing garden theories are Félibien des Avaux, abbé Laugier and Dézallier d'Argenville as well as the later J.F. Blondel, Thomas Whately and C.C.L. Hirschfeld.

The oldest and most remarkable book in the library, at first sight a love story but containing a lot of ancient wisdom, exquisite woodcuts and descriptions of antique, ruined buildings, has the reputation of being the most beautiful book ever printed and moreover the most enigmatic one. That is Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, here in the second edition from 1545 (Aldus), bought at an auction in 1812 with the property left by the late Louis Masreliez. <Back to list of content



MARGARETA LINDGREN:
Architectural drawings at the Uppsala University Library.

Carl Johan Hjelm, architectural drawing. The Archives at Uppsala University Library The Department of Maps and Prints of the university library is one of two collections of maps and pictures connected with major libraries in Sweden, the other one being in the Royal Library in Stockholm. Considerable donations during the 19th century (especially the Westin donation in 1877) added to older material in the library and led to the foundation of a specialized department. The Westin collection, as well as the older ones, contained architectural drawings. Alas, these have not been systematically catalogued. When Åke Davidsson published his catalogue Swedish hand-drawings in Uppsala University Library in 1958, he intentiously excluded drawings of architecture. Others who have been working with the architectural drawings, as Ulla Ehrensvärd, have not included all existing items and the results are only available in manuscript form. About a decade ago, when the department started to change the out-of-date portfolios of the topographically organized part of the Westin collection, the hand-drawn material was separated to a file of its own. In connection with this, notes were taken and a description made of these objects which will serve as a good starting-point for a planned computer catalogue with added digitalized pictures and easier and more complete ways of searching (by architect's name, genre, period etc.). In spite of lacking cataloguing, it has always been possible to look up if we have a special item asked for by making a topographical search in our collections.

Finally, examples are listed of the vast variety of architectural drawings in the library. Many of them are well-known, referred to, and published in papers and books and used for exhibition purposes also abroad. <Back to list of content



SUSANNA STRÖMBERG:
The Stockholm Building Society's book collection.

S.P. Serén, architectural drawing. Photo: Francis Bruun, Stockholm City Museum The Stockholm Building Society's book collection is today kept at the Stockholm City Museum. It was deposited at the museum in 1963 and was inaugurated in new shelves in January 1990.

The Stockholm Building Society was founded in 1848 by G.T. Chiewitz, J.F. Åbom and E.A. Grandinson. The ambition of the society members was to build beautiful and well adapted houses for the citizens of Stockholm. An important resource in the society's internal education was the library with Swedish and foreign books and journals. The books from this pioneer period reflect the professions and interests of its members.

Through the library, the members had access to knowledge about technology, bridge construction, the art of ship building and international architecture. At the turn of the century, the importance of the library decreased due to general developments, which made access to academic literature easier for private persons.

The need for suitable storage was discussed at many of the society's meetings. In 1963 the Building Society decided to deposit the collection at the Stockholm City Museum. The motives for the deposition were that the library had lost its importance for the members and that the older part of the collection was of considerable cultural and technical interest. The library contains Swedish, German, French and English literature and journals. It contains 270 books, collections of engravings, and 25 journals.

One of the main reasons for the deposit of the collection was that the Stockholm City Museum was to make the collection generally available for research in architectural history. The museum's own conservation officers have often used the book collection. It has also been used for doctoral dissertations and publications. For future researchers, there is still much to explore on the subject of architecture and technical science. <Back to list of content



LISELOTTE WINKA: The Fred Forbat Book Collection
in the Library of the Swedish Museum of Architecture.

Fred Forbat, architectural drawing, 1923. The Swedish Museum of Architecture, Stockholm Fred Forbat (1897-1972) was born in Pécs, Hungary. He was educated as an architect in Budapest and Munich. After having finished his studies in 1920, Forbat was employed in Walter Gropius' architect's office at the Bauhaus in Weimar. Due to the political situation, Forbat decided to emigrate to Sweden in 1938. During the 1940s and 1950s he concentrated on urban planning, and was appointed Professor of Urban Planning at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm in 1959.

The Fred Forbat Book Collection is one of nearly 250 architects' collections donated to or otherwise acquired by the Swedish Museum of Architecture. The Forbat Collection mainly consists of literature on architecture and housing questions in Germany during the 1920s and 1930s, which reflects the early Functionalistic period in Europe. The collection contains approximately 200 titles. The author's text concentrates on some 50 titles, selected with regard to Forbat's architectural work and his reading interests. The book collection is divided into six categories or subjects: art and architectural theory, monographs on architects and artists, art history, history of architecture, literature on housing questions and urban planning.
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ELISABETH KIHLÉN:
The library and the conservation of buildings.

Photo: Ola Eriksson, Regionmuseum Västra Götaland On the Nääs Estate, north east of Gothenburg, the August Abrahamson Foundation has established an education centre for teaching the proper care of buildings, with training courses, research and development as integrated activities. In the summer of 1990 the documentation centre, named Byggnadsvård Nääs, opened to the general public with the purpose of providing knowledge and information about traditional building techniques. The documentation centre consists of a library, an exhibition on building conservation, a product exhibition, courses and conferences. <Back to list of content



ULRIKA LESSMAR HOLMGREN:
The architectural database ARKDOK.

Logotype: Jesper Nilsson, The Swedish Museum of Architecture, Stockholm ARKDOK is the name of the Swedish Museum of Architecture's database, which makes it possible to obtain information about the museum's and other archives' architectural sketches, drawings, documents, photographs and models. ARKDOK also contains information about individual architects, existing buildings, the museum's exhibitions since 1962, the museum's yearbooks, and the location of the collections in the museum's storage rooms.

ARKDOK consists of a total of 500,000 records divided in 14 registers. During the period 1992-2000, a staff of approximately 100 persons has been engaged in the endeavor of enhancing the accessibility of the collections. <Back to list of content



LISBETH RAAHAUGE KARLSSON: Architects, architecture, and architectural literature on the Internet.

Illustration: Aksel Raahauge Karlsson During the last five to ten years there has been an explosion in Internet-resources relevant to architecture: architectural studios have established homepages, text and picture archives have been digitalized by libraries and museums, indexes of collections have been made available, e-zines created, portals developed. Experiments on how to use the Internet as a mediator of architecture are being carried out with an exploration of different ways to make digitalized resources available to researchers, teachers, and students. The purpose of this article is to provide an impression of the development of architectural resources on the Internet, as well as to give a short evaluation of some of the resources. Finally it will point to some trends regarding architecture on the Internet. <Back to list of content



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Copyright © The Authors, 2002. All rights reserved.